Sturgeon’s Law of Politics

Sixty years or so ago, science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon got fed up with being asked why so much science fiction was so badly written. Rising to the defense of his field, he responded by saying it wasn’t actually any worse than any other. “Ninety percent of everything is crap,” he said.

It’s an adage now enthroned as Sturgeon’s Law. In any field you can name, the vast bulk of human endeavor is, at best, mediocre. The cream rises to the top, and, comparatively, there really isn’t a lot of it.

It’s an adage that might go along way toward explaining the sorry state of American politics—not because so much of what is said is crap, but because so few of us realize that this applies to both sides. Continue reading Sturgeon’s Law of Politics

Birthright citizenship and “subject to the jurisdiction thereof”

President Trump says he wants to issue an executive order rescinding birthright citizenship to children of illegal immigrants (and possibly other non-citizens). His opponents say, among other things, that such a move is unconstitutional.

But are they right? I’m going to argue “probably yes, but not for the reasons the news analyses I’ve seen think.” (My analysis would also make it unconstitutional for Congress to do this, as well.) Kinda wonky stuff, but here goes: Continue reading Birthright citizenship and “subject to the jurisdiction thereof”