Clemson, Ostarine, and the Olympics

I am a fan of college football. I went to one football school as an undergrad, another as a grad student, and taught at a third. And while the concussion problem has dampened my enthusiasm a bit, I still appreciate the sport’s athleticism, as well as the chess-game aspects of offense and defense. I even like the intricacies of the rules, in which it appears that someone not only anticipated anything that can possibly happen, but wrote a rule to cover it. As an official in another sport, I can tell you this is not always the case.

But I am very disheartened by what I’m going to call the Clemson doping scandal. Continue reading Clemson, Ostarine, and the Olympics

Richard A. Lovett writes & hangs out with runners

Richard A. Lovett is my professional name. Friends know me as Rick. I’ve done a lot of things in my life, but these days, I’m primarily a writer and running coach. The details are elsewhere on this site, but for now, I’ll cut to the chase:

Science writing. Over the years, I’ve written for a lot of science magazines and websites, including Science, Nature, New Scientist, Scientific American, National Geographic News, and Analog Science Fiction & Fact.

Science fiction. My work has largely appeared in Analog, but I’ve also sold to Nature, Cosmos, Apex & Abyss, and a number of other magazines.

Awards. I’ve won 13 of Analog’s Analytical Laboratory Awards, which is basically a reader’s choice award, split about equally between fiction and science.

Sports writing. I don’t write about the latest scores; I write about how to improve your own game–generally in distance running, though I’ve also written about bicycle touring and cross-country skiing. Mostly, it’s appeared in  Running Times, Marathon & Beyond, and Competitor.

• Coaching. For 15 years, I’ve coached  Portland, Oregon’s, 250-member Team Red Lizard. Seven times, I’ve  also had the privilege of coaching women for the U.S. Olympic Team Marathon Trials—twice each in 2012, 2016, and now, three times for 2020.

The science of running and aging

I wrote this article in 2009 for Running Times, and amazingly it’s still online. It’s also an evergreen topic: “The Science of Aging and Running: Why your body slows and what you can do about it.

Last spring, fresh into a new masters age group, I ran a 5K. Nothing unusual in that; I’d run spring 5Ks the year before … and the year before that … for quite a few years. The surprise was that I was 45 seconds faster than I’d been in any recent year. Age-graded, it was a massive PR.

Short course, I thought, but a couple weeks later, I did it again, then twice more. Friends were wondering about my training. “What are you doing differently?” they asked.

When I went back and looked at my training logs, the answer was surprising: I’d cut back my mileage. I’d done it simply because I was busy, but as the winter progressed, my speed workouts had responded. For masters runners, less is often more.

Aging, like injuries, is one of those things most of us prefer to deny...read more.